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Full article at the Myanmar Times: http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/opinion/18676-rule-of-law-depends-on-reform-of-union-attorney-general-s-office.html 

Recent political discussion in Myanmar revolves around the formation of a new government and selection of a president, but not enough attention is focused on the position of the attorney general, who holds a critical function in upholding rule of law and respect for human rights.

Students arrested in a police crackdown on their peaceful protests against the education law in March 2015 arrive for a court hearing on May 12, 2015. Lawyers and activists complain the trial is taking too long. Photo: Aung Myin Ye Zaw / The Myanmar TimesStudents arrested in a police crackdown on their peaceful protests against the education law in March 2015 arrive for a court hearing on May 12, 2015. Lawyers and activists complain the trial is taking too long. Photo: Aung Myin Ye Zaw / The Myanmar Times

The attorney general is Myanmar’s most powerful legal officer: As a member of the executive, the AG provides legal advice to the President and the hluttaw, analyses international treaties, drafts and amends laws, and represents the government in judicial proceedings. The attorney general also directs the prosecutors’ office and ensures that cabinet actions are legally valid, in line with the constitution and international human rights law.

The International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), international donors and development partners discussed the attorney general’s powerful role on the sidelines of the launch for the Union Attorney General Office’s (UAGO) Strategic Plan 2015-19 in Nay Pyi Taw last week. All expressed hope that the incoming National League for Democracy (NLD) government will appoint an attorney general committed to reform, the rule of law and human rights, in line with their election manifesto promise to ensure that executive and judicial systems support the rule of law.

Re: Burma Responsible Investment Reporting Requirements

We write in response to the public reports submitted by U.S. companies in compliance with the Burma Responsible Investment Reporting Requirements (“Reporting Requirements”) issued by the US Department of State.

Composed of 60 eminent jurists and lawyers from all regions of the world, the International Commission of Jurists promotes and protects human rights through the Rule of Law, by using its unique legal expertise to develop and strengthen national and international justice systems. The ICJ appreciates the U.S. government’s efforts to promote responsible investment in Myanmar and to ensure that U.S. companies are responsibly managing their business activity in the country. We support your decision to continue to sanction businesses under the National Emergencies Act barring U.S. individuals and companies from investing or doing business with people linked to human rights abuses under the army’s military rule.

The ICJ urges caution over the United State’s recent decision to allow for an exception to the sanctions regime for people who have already been documented as having links to the military regime and implicated in human rights violations.1 This caution reflects the ICJ’s work with the Directorate of Investment and Company Administration, the Attorney General’s Office, and the Union Supreme Court of Myanmar, as well as civil society organizations, to strengthen and support local efforts at ensuring that investment protects and promotes the rule of law, human rights and the environment. In this regard, the ICJ has visited and researched on the human rights and environmental impacts of investments in the 3 Special Economic Zones (“SEZ”), as well as other non- SEZ sites, in the country.

We believe that future reporting must be strengthened to ensure that U.S. companies comply with the Reporting Requirements, conduct due diligence and disclose adequate information transparently about the impact of their business practices on human rights in Myanmar. This is especially crucial in light of significant reporting gaps in July 2013. Failure to strengthen the requirements will undermine the goal of the Reporting Requirement to be a tool for promoting investment that reinforces those political and economic reforms that are compliant with the rule of law and human rights and help to empower civil society.

The full document will be available on the ICJ webpage at: http://www.icj.org later today. The full document is attached here: Myanmar ICJ Letter to US State Dept 25Jan2016

Despite recent media reports to the contrary, the new investment law for Myanmar has not been passed and is scheduled to be debated in parliament in 2016.

(For example: http://www.irrawaddy.com/burma/after-much-deliberation-investment-law-approved-by-parliament.html; http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/myanmars-investment-law-approved-by-parliamant)

The confusion was caused over amendments to the existing Myanmar Citizens Law and Foreign Investment Laws that delegates some of the MIC’s powers to State and Regional bodies, allowing for more local involvement in granting investment permits. This development itself is an interesting issue that needs to be explored further.

Nevertheless, The Directorate of Investment and Companies Administration (DICA) has confirmed that the new investment law has not been passed.

 

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